comment 0

Tiananmen Square: The Unnamed Heroes

Twenty five years ago today, despite China’s brutal stance towards protests, nearly one million Chinese took to the streets in hopes to gain political freedom.  Rather than flee for a better life abroad, these brave individuals fought for personal civil liberties in their homeland.   Their names aren’t on any memorial walls or statues, but their faces will always be a remembered.  They simply had a dream.

s_t04_52017200

s_t08_05180199

Tiananmen-Square-10_130192k

CHINA-BEIJING SPRING-TIANANMEN-WORKERS

CHINA-RIGHTS-TIANANMEN-POLITICS-ANNIVERSARY-FILES

CHINA-BEIJING SPRING-DEMO

China’s Communist Party acts as if this historic event never happened.   Not only has it never been printed in their history books, there is absolutely no reference of this event online.  In fact, no one can even mention the words “Tiananmen Square Massacre” without arrest.  Despite the Communist Party’s tight grasp on internet censorship, [Side note: President Xi Jinping recently enforced the strictest internet censorship regulations China has ever seen.]  I feel it’s important the younger generation are aware of this history.  The Tiananmen Square Massacre did happen and these heroic individuals did make history.

When I look at the faces of these young people, I find myself feeling a little envious.  I mean, they lived fearlessly and purposefully.  I have never sacrificed or felt that amount of passion for any cause.  It’s hard for me to relate.  I’m not a gay activist.  I’m not fighting to reform health care.  I don’t campaign for political leaders I believe in…  despite all of these things having a significant impact on my daily life.  Having said that, if I had been a student in Beijing in 1989, I know I would’ve been at Tiananmen Square that day.  But, knowing me, I don’t know if I would have been as fearless.

I guess the reason I posted this is even though the protestors pictured here, and the hundreds of other thousands like, didn’t receive the recognition they were hoping for, doesn’t mean their actions and deaths were for nothing.  For me, after learning more each year about what happened on that square 25 years ago, I realize it’s never too late to show up.

s3.amazonaws.com-policymic-images-85af376a188f304c1a457fe7953ba2e8ca443d79bfd4dc879b3a66119226fa49

s3.amazonaws.com-policymic-images-55645045300c68e07b1e6d18a040691c9c37d2d18805459dc34dc6a5ed99be33

s3.amazonaws.com-policymic-images-d14a0d3138eb7d517e0b608673c787a74a4bdfb9d51f1c760a052019f2a1f9c4

CHINA-BEIJING SPRING-TIANANMEN-MASSACRE

FILES-CHINA-POLITICS-RIGHTS-TIANANMEN

smoke-rises-from-a-burning-car-during-a-riot-near-tiananmen-squ-data

CHINA-BEIJING SPRING-TIANANMEN-HUNGER STRIKER

Help spread awareness.

 

For reactions from around the world, click here.

Advertisements
Filed under: Hong Kong, Travel

About the Author

Posted by

Hi. Welcome to Hong Kong… according to Ken. Me! I’m a Texas guy that now lives in Hong Kong. I left my life as I knew it, to start a new life. One filled with unfamiliar sites, languages, foods, smells, culture and people. This “leap of faith” is still leaping, but I’m beginning to see the ground beneath me. If you ever wondered what it would be like to pack your bags, say good bye to everyone you know, jump on a plane to another world- then get ready. Here’s a look at life in Hong Kong… according to Ken.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s